Pine Barrens Abductions

December 21, 2017

The Jersey Devil has been blamed for quite a few kidnappings throughout the years.  Like most evil beings, once it has you trapped, you are not going anywhere.  With the uptick in curiosity about the Jersey Devil’s connection to the Pine Barrens of south Jersey, a forensics group was dispatched to a location that was believed to have been used by the creature or an associate, as a makeshift prison, or holding cell. 

 

The property was allegedly owned by associates of the Leeds family, and until 1997, there was a private-property sign and a fence surrounding the half-acre of woods where this bunker was located.  When the last member of the family who owned the property died, the local government declared it green acres, and sent the team to investigate. 

 

From the outside, the structure resembled a storage shack.  The outside walls were made of wood, and there was heavy brush surrounding the building on all sides except the entrance.   The door was heavy and metal, and the entire inside of the 10x12 structure was made of concrete.  The only objects found inside were metal rings that were on the floor.  Forensics revealed the DNA of five separate females.  Only two of the women were on file.  Both were runaway teenagers.  According to the timeline of their disappearances, the lasts two victims were taken in the summer of 1991, and the fall of 1992.

 

Neither victim has been seen since.  Both are presumed dead.  Authorities will not release any details on the victims or possible suspects, but the Leeds connection makes a strong case for the Jersey Devil being somehow involved.  Also, on wall on the opposite side of the door was a small image.  Initially it looked like a smudge, but after analyzing, it was discovered to have a been drawn in blood.  Maybe one of the victims was trying to identify her captor.

 

 (Pine Barrens 1997)

 

Please reload

Featured Posts

Buzzkill Trivia - Missing

March 19, 2018

1/5
Please reload

Categories 
Please reload

Recent Posts

August 17, 2019

February 7, 2019

January 7, 2019

January 2, 2019

December 26, 2018

December 5, 2018

December 3, 2018

Please reload

Archive